Monday, June 15, 2009

Five Ways A Writer Can Make More Money

These are really exciting times for writers. This is mainly because the World Wide Web has opened up opportunities that did not exist previously. There are amazing new opportunities that are capable of helping any writer market and sell their work very efficiently and successfully.

1. Sell More By Giving Out Information On Your Book

One of the greatest obstacles potential purchaseers of books have always had in making a decision on whether or not to purchase a title, is getting enough information about It. Detailed summaries and synopsis as well as comments by others who have read the book can be very useful. This is the reason behind the phenomenal success of the legendary site.

Any writer can create their own miniature site that can do miracles for their book sales. The idea is to solicit comments and views from those who have already read the book and then publishing them on your website.

By joining a useful affiliate program or two, you can ensure that you have the potential to earn maximum from visitors to your site who do not end up purchasing anything. Pay-per-click affiliate programs like Adsense are especially worth considering.

2. Sell Information Through A Newsletter

As you gather the information for your book, you can sell it in bits and pieces through a newsletter. A newsletter is extremely easy to do and manage online. More so if you have all the right tools. Incidentally it is very possible to gather them all from one site.

3. Special Reports Are Still Hot Sellers Online

Special reports are in high demand online because many people do not have the time or inclination to read a whole book to pick up the skills and knowledge they are looking for. A special report offers all this information where it can be picked up quickly and implemented immediately by the reader.

Writers can make a very useful income from information that grows from a short article in their newsletter into a special report.

4. Build Up A Mailing List For Book Sales

All the three activities mentioned so far, can be used to build up a valuable mailing list that can be used later to market the book once it has been published.

Some writers have managed to sell thousands of copies of their books in this way by simply getting the word out to their mailing lists of several hundred thousand targeted and very potential purchaseers of their books.

5. Publish Your Book Online

Again with the right tools, you can publish your book and make it available online at your site, only when somebody has paid a small subscription fee. There is a certain free site with the amazing feature where you can do this. It is

Every writer should make an effort to make full use of all the high number of unprecedented weapons and tools that are capable of helping a writer earn much more from their writing

Plot & Structure: (Techniques And Exercises For Crafting A Plot That Grips Readers From Start To Finish) (Write Great Fiction)

Sunday, June 14, 2009

How Are You Plotting?

Creative Writing Tips –Plotting

Writing is a creative process and how every writer chooses to create, is individual to them. Likewise, with plotting, every writer plots at a level they are comfortable with.

Some just plot the bare essentials. They have a firm idea of the story they want to write and have a good memory to be able to memorize everything.

Others go into more detail. These writers prefer to figure everything out before they write the story.

How you plot will also depend on your level of experience. For the beginner, it’s recommended to plot thoroughly.

Before writing, think of every possible situation. Plot events thoroughly, plot scenes to the last detail and generally leave no questions unasked or unanswered. This way you will always know where you’re going.


Are You Using The ‘What If’ Technique When Plotting?

Your short story of 500, 2.000, 10.000 words or whatever word length you choose to write, will spring from a single idea - Perhaps a one-sentence idea.

So when you are still in that one sentence stage, using the ‘What If,’ technique is a good way of generating ideas to build on that initial story idea.

While you are in the plotting stage, experiment. Your aim should be to write the best story you can. Experiment to see what bits and pieces you can put together to write the best story ever.

So using ‘What If,’ ask yourself questions then answer them…

1.What if the character was like this?
2.What if this happened to him?
3.What if I placed him in this situation? How would he react?
4.What if I took this away from him?
5.What if his worst fear came true?
6.What if he doesn’t get what he wants? What will he do?
7.What if I placed this obstacle in his path? What will he do?
You’ll be surprised what you come up with, if you take the time to experiment

Plot & Structure: (Techniques And Exercises For Crafting A Plot That Grips Readers From Start To Finish) (Write Great Fiction)

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Further The Theme

Does Each Element of Your Story Further The Theme?

Creative Writing Tips –

Whichever theme you choose, all the elements, which make up your story, dialogue, conflict, scenes, etc should be written with the theme in mind.

Your theme should progress the story.

If you find that anything in your story doesn’t progress it, it should be cut when you are in the editing stage.

Before we see an example of elements written with a theme in mind, let’s think of a theme and a story….

The theme is…

‘Arrogance Leads To Humiliation’

Very briefly, this story is about a character that believes he is better than his colleagues.

His goal is to get promoted to a managerial position. What will prevent him from reaching his goal, is the fact that management are aware of his arrogance and they don’t believe, with his attitude, he is the right person to manage the staff.

To meet his goal, the character will take on more work than he can handle. He will do this to prove to management, that he is the right man for the job. But in the end, he will make a grave error and his arrogance will lead him to humiliation.

Now let’s take a look at the elements of this story…


The character’s dialogue will show his arrogance, by the tone of his voice and the words he chooses to express himself.


I will show my character is arrogant by the way I describe him and from how other characters see him.


I will explain what makes him think he is better than everyone else.


I will state his goal and show how it arises from the fact that he believes himself better than everyone else.


The setting is going to be in an office environment. I can show his arrogance through the setting by perhaps describing the contents of his desk (trophies) and his desk area in general (diplomas on the walls.) etc.


The conflict will come from himself. He is the one that creates it by doing and saying things, which create dislike.


The climax is the highest point in my story where the conflict and his arrogance will come to their peak. Here we will see how he tries to overcome the conflict and reach his goal by taking on more work.


I will end my story with my character’s humiliation. He takes on more work and makes an error in judgement. Which not only prevents his promotion but also gets him fired.

My theme here would have run its course

Plot & Structure: (Techniques And Exercises For Crafting A Plot That Grips Readers From Start To Finish) (Write Great Fiction)

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Creative Writing That Sells

A Guide to Creative Writing That Sells

It's unbelievable that with all the creative writing courses out there, that no one teaches the necessity of researching your market before you set pen to paper.

Yes, we all want to be creative and let our imagination go. At the same time, wouldn't it be great to have some of your work published? Even better wouldn't it be awesome to know that you have upped your chances of getting published by around 80% by simply doing a tiny bit of browsing in a library or bookstore?

Here is a way to make sure that there is an interest in your type of story before you pick up a pen or pull out your laptop:

1) Go to the local bookstore and read the writing magazines. Editors actually tell these magazines what they are interested in, in a fairly timely manner. Most of the guess work is taken out for you. You know which editors are looking for what type of stories.

2) Look at the current Writer's Guide. It is filled with editors and publishers looking for fresh material. And guess what? They also tell you what each editor wants and what they are sick to death of.

3) Check out the bookshelves to see which children's books are featured. Is there a trend or pattern? For example the last few years Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl and Charlie Bone have all been hot. It doesn't take a brain surgeon to figure out that magical characters have taken kids and editors by storm.

4) Ask kids what their favorite books are. Ask them why they like one over the other. Ask if their friends are into the same books. Model these themes.

There is no need to reinvent the wheel or hire a psychic to figure out what publishers, editors and your audience - kids, are looking for. Gather this information and apply it to your writing.

Watch the number of your submissions rise, while your rejection letters become few and far between.

Plot & Structure: (Techniques And Exercises For Crafting A Plot That Grips Readers From Start To Finish) (Write Great Fiction)